The Expanding Role of the IT Security Team

Ask any customers considering cloud computing services to identify their primary concern, odds are that security will be somewhere near the top of the list.  That concern is leading some in the industry to contemplate an expanding role of the IT security professional from developing and implementing corporate security policies to becoming more heavily involved in cloud computing contract negotiations and service level enforcement.   In my experience, however, that is only part of the expanding role of IT security professionals. 

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Software as a Service in China: Legal Requirements and Solutions for U.S. Software Businesses

 By: Fred GregurasXiao Liu1

Software as a service (“SaaS”) or cloud computing is an important software delivery model for many business applications.2 The software and required data are hosted centrally and accessed with a web browser over the Internet. This delivery model emerged in the United States, led by Salesforce.com (“SFDC”), and has become part of the business model of all major software companies. The other software delivery model is on-premise software that is installed on a server on a business' computer network.

Cloud computing has been made possible by the wide-spread availability of greater bandwidth, particularly wireless bandwidth, more powerful processors and inexpensive network storage. In cloud computing, computing resources are made available to the user as needed rather than a business paying for and operating an under-utilized server farm loaded with expensive software. Maintaining on-premise computing resources to meet peak requirements is not cost-effective and can negatively impact financial statements. With SaaS, additional computing power and user software licenses or subscriptions can be activated as needed. SaaS simplifies hardware and software deployment, speeds up application implementation and enables a software business to more easily support its customers.
 

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Data Redux

CIO Magazine recently discussed four cloud providers that have shut down or are in the process of shutting down, and the difficulties some customers might face as they attempt to extract their data from those vendors.   Short of storming the data center and forcibly removing the hard drives, what's a customer to do when a cloud provider stops returning calls?

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